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Thursday 17 October 2019
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The Different Solo GoPro Picture

We live in an age of the social media platform. Instagram and Facebook are stages that give us all a chance to share our kayak fishing passion with the world. We as anglers love to capture those special moments on the water. Whether it be the grip and grin hero shot, the breathtaking landscape portrait, or the action image. I particularly enjoy seizing these very instances just like the next kayak angler. I like to do it in a way that depicts both that frame in time, but also the surroundings of my environment.
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Many kayak anglers own the GoPro action camera and it can be used for more than shooting epic videos. The GoPro also takes amazing high definition pictures. The correct angle and camera function can allow you the ability to get the ultimate photo. A different photo then maybe someone else might be taking. I want my pictures to be as unique as possible and there are a few ways to do that. First and foremost get acquainted with your GoPro and its settings. Specifically the time lapse function and the way you control the time interval performance.
If you are familiar with this setting than you know it gives you the ability to configure the GoPro to take pictures at different time intervals. This is an extremely useful tool when fishing by yourself or if you have separated yourself from a group. The intervals can be set in succession of seconds. Depending on the setting chosen by the user, the camera with shoot pictures every 5,10, or 30 seconds. I like the 5 second interlude between images taken. It seems to be the perfect time for me to get the shot I’m looking for. The neat thing about the time lapse setting is going through the pictures at the end of the day. You can acquire action shots as you lift your fish from the water or as you’re releasing that very same catch. It is always a surprise when you start to download the pictures.

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Placing your GoPro in various locations is key to allow yourself to get the most out of your pictures. If I’m close enough to the bank after catching a fish then that is where I want to go. Getting your camera in a stationary position outside of the kayak will give you the ability to get more of the kayak and surroundings in the picture. Use tripod mounts for the best results on the bank or camera pole that can be pushed into the ground. Use what the natural habitat gives you. Use a clamp mount on a tree limb or again the tripod mount on a large rock in the middle of the river. There are endless options and you can find what is best for your situation. I also use the wide angle option on my GoPro to detain more of the backdrop.
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Some readers of this may think, “How do you keep the fish alive and healthy while you’re setting everything up?”. That is a relative question and the fish grip is the answer. All the newest Jackson Kayaks come equipped with the fish grip. I don’t and do not recommend paddling long distances with a fish on the grip, but it will not hurt a fish in water to travel to the bank in order to set up your camera. Once you have set up your camera and tuned it to perform, then simply hold the fish in position for the picture. While doing so you will get different shots every 5 seconds. The red light will blink indicating the picture was taken and it will continue to take them in that interval until you stop the camera from doing so. Placing your GoPro on the bank is also a way to capture yourself in action. Things like dragging your kayak, paddling, or any different photo that would be cool to share.
All Jackson Kayaks are GoPro ready, but this process will give you the opportunity to get you and your kayak in the picture. Instead of you and the fish or the top of the kayak, it really gives a different perspective to the viewer. I like turning my kayak parallel with the camera to gain that optical appearance of the entire vicinity. Sometimes you have to paddle or maneuver yourself back into the frame, but this just gives the camera time to take pictures that may turn out cool. Trial and error is something that will make your pictures interesting and help you learn along the way. Get creative with the angles or play with the intervals and settings. This does take time away from fishing and sometimes might hurt you if you’re on a hot spot, but these fishing moments happen so quickly that it’s ok to slow down and enjoy them. I hope this helps some of you capture a special fishing moment differently. If you have any questions please comment and as always tight lines.
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Some readers of this may think, “How do you keep the fish alive and healthy while you’re setting everything up?”. That is a relative question and the fish grip is the answer. All the newest Jackson Kayaks come equipped with the fish grip. I don’t and do not recommend paddling long distances with a fish on the grip, but it will not hurt a fish in water to travel to the bank in order to set up your camera. Once you have set up your camera and tuned it to perform, then simply hold the fish in position for the picture. While doing so you will get different shots every 5 seconds. The red light will blink indicating the picture was taken and it will continue to take them in that interval until you stop the camera from do so. Placing your GoPro on the bank is also a way to capture yourself in action. Things like dragging your kayak, paddling, or any different photo that would be cool to share.

All Jackson Kayaks are GoPro ready, but this process will give you the opportunity to get you and your kayak in the picture. Instead of you and the fish or the top of the kayak, it really gives a different perspective to the viewer. I like turning my kayak parallel with the camera to gain that optical appearance of the entire vicinity. Sometimes you have to paddle or maneuver yourself back into the frame, but this just gives the camera time to take pictures that may turn out cool. Trial and error is something that will make your pictures interesting and help you learn along the way. Get creative with the angles or play with the intervals and settings. This does take time away from fishing and sometimes might hurt you if you’re on a hot spot, but these fishing moments happen so quickly that it’s ok to slow down and enjoy them. I hope this helps some of you capture a special fishing moment differently. If you have any questions please comment and as always tight lines.